Charlie Gard to 'inevitably' die shortly in hospice

Charlie Gard will be moved to a hospice. Above the baby with his parents Connie Yates and Chris Gard

Charlie Gard will be moved to a hospice. Above the baby with his parents Connie Yates and Chris Gard

But his doctors opposed this, arguing that hospices focus on supportive care in the final stages of illness, and are not usually set up to accommodate keeping an infant in Charlie's condition alive.

After Charlie's parents, Chris Gard and Connie Yates, eventually ended their legal battle to save their son's life because the hospital didn't treat him soon enough, the hospital refused to allow them to take Charlie home to die.

Mr Justice Francis ordered that if the dispute was not settled, 11-month-old Charlie would be moved to a hospice and life-support treatment would be withdrawn shortly after he arrives.

Observers around the world took sides with or against Charlie's parents in their fight against a London hospital
Observers around the world took sides with or against Charlie's parents in their fight against a London hospital

The couple has endured long courts battles not only to keep Charlie's life support going but also trying to seek experimental treatment in the United States for his condition.

Judge Francis had scheduled a two-day hearing to consider fresh evidence by Dr Hirano who had come to London from Columbia Medical Center in NY to examine Charlie. The terminally ill baby boy will be moved from Great Ormond Street Hospital in London, where he has been receiving treatment, to a hospice.

The case caught the attention of US President Donald Trump and Pope Francis and the cause garnered widespread grassroots support.

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And she is restricted from using hot tubs, changing cat litter, applying hair dye or drinking too much caffeine. She even appeared in a promotional video with her own family to explain the process to potential parents-to-be.

The judge additionally ruled that neither the hospice nor its staff can be identified.

Yates is asking to be allowed to choose the team that would care for Charlie.

Charlie's mother left the courtroom in distress before the judge gave his ruling.

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The guardian was appointed to represent Charlie's interests as relations between his parents and Great Ormond Street Hospital, a pioneering pediatric center, soured.

"We deeply regret that profound and heartfelt differences between Charlie's doctors and his parents have had to be played out in court over such a protracted period".

The fight had begun in April 2017 when the hospital in Great Ormond Street had chose to discontinuous care of the baby, suffering from a rare genetic disorder (the syndrome of depletion of mitochondrial DNA which affects the cells responsible for the production of energy and breathing), feeling that it would only extended his suffering without the hope of recovery. "Charlie has suffered from muscle atrophy is severe". It's never too late to pray for baby Charlie.

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"Put simply, this is about a sweet, gorgeous, innocent little boy who was born with a rare disease, who had a real, genuine chance at life and a family who love him so very dearly and that's why we fought so hard for him", his parents said in a statement earlier this week.

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